Eating Acorns and Sharing with Woodpeckers

CreatespaceAcornsAndEat'emFRONTCOVERNature never ceases to amaze me. Did you know that a woodpecker has a tongue that is twice the length of its beak? It is so long, when not in use, it wraps up inside the bird’s head cavity. When it is in use, it drills down ant hills and scoops out the prey. Here’s the sad part. When there aren’t enough acorns, woodpeckers die. And you know the dead trees that are full of holes that are full of acorns? Those are called granaries and they take years to build up and support woodpecker communities.

As more and more people learn to enjoy cooking with acorns, I hope they will not forget the myriad of woodland animals who depend on them for food. It’s that time of year. Let’s gather acorns. But let’s leave an abundance for the birds.Secret Genealogy IV Cover

Suellen Ocean is the author of Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns, http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973 and Secret Genealogy IV – Native Americans Hidden in Our Family Trees. http://www.amazon.com/Secret-Genealogy-IV-Native-Americans/dp/1500756105

 

 

Acorn Preparation… Make Sure All the Tannic Acid is Removed

CreatespaceAcornsAndEat'emFRONTCOVERStep two in acorn preparation is leaching and it is the most important factor. If the tannic acid is not removed, your acorn meal will be bitter and your tummy might ache and your gums might pucker and blister. Doesn’t sound very appetizing does it? Don’t let that stop you, many foods need preparation.

Thoroughly leached acorns are a delight. If I was loopy, I’d say that acorns are a portal into the earth and that they bring magic to your life. As I look onto the bright green oak shoots that signal the advent of spring, and watch the birds flit between them, I am reminded of the strength the oak brings to living things throughout the world.

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Rinsing out the tannin returns the acid to the soil, nourishing future harvests of acorns the forest animals depend on. The cycle of life goes round and round. Gathering and preparing acorns has us step into that earthy world, even if only for a short time.  Suellen Ocean is the author of Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns. Find it here: http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973

… and Secret Genealogy IV – Native Americans Hidden in Our Family Trees. Available here:

http://www.amazon.com/Secret-Genealogy-IV-Native-Americans/dp/1500756105

 

Genealogy: Indians Hidden in Our Family Trees

When Americans study genealogy, they find all kinds of things they weren’t expecting. That’s what makes it fun. One of the surprises in your family tree may be a branch of American Indian ancestry. But how can you tell? How can you find out for sure? It’s not always easy, especially when their Indian names have been changed. But there are things you can look for and surname lists you can check. A lot of Americans have Indians in their tree and they are not aware of which ancestors they are. A little study of Indian territory maps and a look at Indian removal rolls might send your genealogical sleuthing in a whole different direction. 

Suellen Ocean is the author of Secret Genealogy IV – Native Americans Hidden in Our Family Trees. Available here:

http://www.amazon.com/Secret-Genealogy-IV-Native-Americans/dp/1500756105

eBook or computer download through Smashwords:

https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/ocean

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Have Native American Ancestry But Can’t Find It?

Join the list of people who know they have Native American ancestry but can’t find it. It’s hard! Why is that? One reason is because Indians who were passing as Caucasians didn’t want to be found out. They were carving a new life for themselves at a time when Indians were being “removed” to reservations. If it meant they could stay somewhere and build a family farm, they told people they were Black German or Black Dutch. Another reason was because there weren’t many records kept on the Indians until a later date. Sure, the Calvary kept lists for various reasons, and there are some partial early lists kept by the government but American Indians weren’t on census records until later. And of course they had Indian names that we have almost no chance of ever knowing. But there are places you can look. It takes time and patience, probably years. But while you are looking for your Native ancestors, you’ll come in contact with their colorful history and culture.

Suellen Ocean is the author of Secret Genealogy IV – Native Americans Hidden in Our Family Trees. Available here:

http://www.amazon.com/Secret-Genealogy-IV-Native-Americans/dp/1500756105

eBook or computer download through Smashwords:

https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/ocean

Secret Genealogy IV Cover

The Trail of Tears President

We have all heard about the “Trail of Tears.” What many of us don’t know is that there were many trails of tears for Native People. As European newcomers ventured further west the United States government found more and more excuses to “remove” the Indians from their homelands. In 1827 the US government made plans to remove all the Native People from Illinois by 1830. In his new presidency, Andrew Jackson oversaw this “Removal Act” which meant that Native people of all ages were “removed” to new Indian Territory west of the Mississippi River. Imagine the sadness and hardship the Indians had to endure, thousands died from sickness and the harsh weather. The Indians gave Andrew Jackson the name Sharp Knife. Perhaps you have a suspicion that one of your ancestors was Indian. Knowing the dates of removals can help you piece together a timeline to try to figure it all out. Suellen Ocean is the author of Secret Genealogy IV – Native Americans Hidden in Our Family Trees. Available here: http://www.amazon.com/Secret-Genealogy-IV-Native-Americans/dp/1500756105

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How-to Crack Acorns

The best way to crack acorns is with a “Texan Nut Sheller”. Even after thirteen years it is still razor sharp. It works especially well on dry acorns. Be careful it is very sharp, NO KIDS and WATCH YOUR FINGERS!

Cracking Acorns

Suellen Ocean is the author of Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns. Find it here: http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973

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