Acorn Preparation… Make Sure All the Tannic Acid is Removed

CreatespaceAcornsAndEat'emFRONTCOVERStep two in acorn preparation is leaching and it is the most important factor. If the tannic acid is not removed, your acorn meal will be bitter and your tummy might ache and your gums might pucker and blister. Doesn’t sound very appetizing does it? Don’t let that stop you, many foods need preparation.

Thoroughly leached acorns are a delight. If I was loopy, I’d say that acorns are a portal into the earth and that they bring magic to your life. As I look onto the bright green oak shoots that signal the advent of spring, and watch the birds flit between them, I am reminded of the strength the oak brings to living things throughout the world.

Secret Genealogy IV Cover

Rinsing out the tannin returns the acid to the soil, nourishing future harvests of acorns the forest animals depend on. The cycle of life goes round and round. Gathering and preparing acorns has us step into that earthy world, even if only for a short time.  Suellen Ocean is the author of Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns. Find it here: http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973

… and Secret Genealogy IV – Native Americans Hidden in Our Family Trees. Available here:

http://www.amazon.com/Secret-Genealogy-IV-Native-Americans/dp/1500756105

 

Writing and Cooking

The solitude of being a writer, mixes well with cooking. After getting lost in my historical novels, cooking brings me into the “here and now.” One of my favorite desserts is Acorn Chocolate Pie. I fill a graham cracker crust with soft tofu I ran through the food processor with about a quarter cup of leached acorns, a quarter cup of honey, two egg whites and a tablespoon of unsweetened powdered chocolate. I bake it for forty-five min to an hour at 350 degrees. Sitting down with a hot cup of coffee and a slice of acorn chocolate pie is a pleasure that I thoroughly enjoy.CreatespaceAcornsAndEat'emFRONTCOVER

Suellen Ocean is the author of Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns. Find it here: http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973

 

Eating Wild Foods… Leaching Acorns

Leaching Acorns

When leaching acorns, the ratio of water to acorns is important. Acorns are rather starchy and when they’re dry, they soak up a lot of water. I probably use more water than is necessary but I usually say 3 parts water to one part acorns. For example, if you have one cup of acorns, I recommend using at least three cups of water when you put them into the blender to leach them. That’s probably enough. It’s fine if you use more water than that. If you have several cups of acorns, only grind one cup at a time. And don’t forget to take the shells off first!CreatespaceAcornsAndEat'emFRONTCOVER

Suellen Ocean is the author of Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns. Find it here: http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973

 

How-to Crack Acorns

The best way to crack acorns is with a “Texan Nut Sheller”. Even after thirteen years it is still razor sharp. It works especially well on dry acorns. Be careful it is very sharp, NO KIDS and WATCH YOUR FINGERS!

Cracking Acorns

Suellen Ocean is the author of Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns. Find it here: http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973

CreatespaceAcornsAndEat'emFRONTCOVER