Dutch This… Dutch That… What Does It All Mean?

Butterfly BLUE VIOLET Front CoverI was looking in the dictionary and I ran across listings for Dutch this… Dutch that… It stopped me in my tracks. It’ll stop you too… right? Here are the entries:

Dutch means Hollandish. It is also slang for German or Germanic. “Of or pertaining to the Netherlands or its inhabitants.” “Characteristic of the Dutch or their language.” Have you ever seen a black cow with a broad band of white around the middle of its body? That’s a Dutch Belted cow. Ever eaten Dutch cheese? It’s a small, round, hard cheese made from skim milk. But after a semi-colon it says “also cottage cheese.” That’s odd, cottage cheese is not hard, it’s runny. Oh well… we move on to Dutch courage. It means, “it’s the alcohol talking.” In other words, courage due to intoxicants. Too much to drink? Then out the door! Dutch door. A door divided horizontally, so that the lower part can be shut while the upper remains open. My horse has one of those and I love it. He’s so cute the way he hangs his head out the door. Even sick trees get the Dutch moniker in the form of Dutch elm disease. It makes the leaves yellow due to a fungus and can kill the tree. How about Dutch foil? Ever heard of that? Or Dutch leaf or Dutch gold? It’s copper or a copper alloy beaten into thin sheets. The Hollanders use it to decorate toys and paper. Those Hollanders are also known as Dutchmen. Yes, a Dutchman is a native of the Netherlands but it is also used to describe a Dutch vessel, and in carpentry and machinery a Dutchman is an odd piece inserted to fill an opening, hide a defect, or strengthen a weak part. That probably comes about because of the dikes the Dutch made to strengthen their land. Even flowers have a Dutch name. The Dutchman’s breeches is a flowering herb, with white or cream-colored flowers. Another flower also shares the Dutch title; Dutchman’s pipe. A vine that blooms early in the summer, the flowers curve like the bowl of a pipe. And then there’s the world renowned Dutch oven, which refers to the tin screen for roasting before an open fire or a shallow iron kettle for baking with a rimmed cover to hold burning coals. A brick oven also bears the name. The brick walls of a Dutch oven are preheated with a fire. The food is cooked, not by the fire but by the hot walls. Dutch treat, we all know that. That is when each person pays for himself. And last but not least, the Dutch uncle. I had no idea he was so mean. It means one who admonishes or reprimands with great severity and directness, a severe mentor.  Suellen Ocean is the author of many books on diverse topics. Her books are available here:

http://www.amazon.com/Suellen-Ocean/e/B001KC7Z78

 

 

 

Wow! A Vegetarian Drive-Thru Restaurant. The Times They Are a Changin’

One of the worst aspects of travelling has always been what to eat. My husband and I are vegetarians and during the 1970’s it was rough. And then one day vegetarian burritos came on the scene and things got easier. But really… you can only eat so many burritos. Now there’s an option. The people who bring you Amy’s frozen foods, has opened a drive-thru vegetarian restaurant in Rohnert Park, California. For those of you who don’t know where Rohnert Park is, it’s north of San Francisco and the home of Sonoma State University, my old alma mater. Kinda fitting that the town that has the university nicknamed, “Granola State,” would be the world’s first vegetarian drive-thru. There is a problem though… fast-food restaurants encourage us to sit in our cars while they idle. That’s not good for the air we breathe. But hey… it’s a start! Here’s the link: http://m.7×7.com/eat-drink/wheres-beef-worlds-first-vegetarian-drive-thru-opens-rohnert-park?utm_source=7×7+List&utm_campaign=7ba5ba011d-7x7_Daily_Newsletter_3_09_133_7_2013&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_f27205de8b-7ba5ba011d-184837737#bmb=1

Suellen Ocean is the author of Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns. Find it here: http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973

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The Love of Gold Goes Back to the Stone Age

People love gold. I know because I live in the Sierras and I’ve met many modern-day gold miners. They will stand in the hot sun all day with their primitive picks and pans, happy with the thought that maybe they’ll find a nugget or at least enough gold “fines” to make the day worthwhile. Stone Age tools embedded with gold tell us that early man learned how to melt gold and craft with it. The Egyptians became highly skilled gold jewelers by about 5000 B.C.E. Fine specimens can be found in museums. You’ve heard of King Solomon’s mines? Those gold mines brought Solomon great wealth. The precious metal was pounded then stretched and worked into fine jewelry and maybe to decorate military armaments. The gold was used to reward his best soldiers and for the purchase of food and goods for the well-being of his people.

Suellen Ocean is the author of the historic novel The Celtic Prince Available here:

http://www.amazon.com/Celtic-Prince-Before-After/dp/1484086392

eBooks and computer downloads available through Smashwords:

https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/ocean

eBook through Barnes & Noble:

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/celtic-prince-suellen-ocean/1102338307?ean=2940016618968

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The Environment… When is it Okay to Eat Acorns?

When I began gathering and preparing acorns for food, I lived in the Pacific Northwest in a vast forest of tanoak trees. Most years, acorns were so thick on the ground; they sprouted in the spring and created a thick undergrowth of baby oaks. Now I live in the Sierra Foothills and in some areas, there are barely enough acorns to sustain wildlife that depend on them. In that instance, I leave the acorns right where they are. There is no way I want to go to bed at night thinking I have robbed the squirrels of their winter food stash. Where do I feel comfortable collecting acorns? In parks and yards where the acorns are raked up and put into the trash. I understand why people do that but it pains me that they do. Yes, acorns in the yard can be a real mess. Next year, if acorns are abundant, you might mention it to your local elementary school teacher or the local cub scouts. Perhaps they would like to bag some of them up for their history studies or nature survival course. And don’t forget taking some into the house for yourself. They turn cakes and cookies into delicacies. Suellen Ocean is the author of Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns. Find it here: http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973

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Sometimes It’s Not About What You Eat – It’s About What You Don’t Eat

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You want to stay healthy and keep your weight down, right? Rule number one – steer clear of restaurants. You’re in denial if you don’t believe there is a lot of extra calories in restaurant food. Eating out is fun but in moderation. Restaurant chefs add a lot of butter and oil. It’s what makes it tasty. Cooking at home may not be as delicious as what you’ll find in restaurants but you do what it takes to stay healthy. Sometimes it’s not what you eat but what you DON’T eat that keeps you healthy.

Suellen Ocean is the author of the vegetarian cookbook, Poor Jonny’s Cookbook.Available here:

http://www.amazon.com/Poor-Jonnys-Cookbook-Suellen-Ocean/dp/0965114031

eBook or computer download through Smashwords:

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/260122

eBook through Barnes & Noble:

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/poor-jonnys-cookbook-suellen-ocean/1102338251?ean=2940016618609

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Stock Up… Just In Case… But Stock Up On What?

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Stock up on wholegrains like brown rice, wheat berries and corn. Both the wheat berries and the corn can be sprouted, increasing their nutrition and they are likely to stay uneaten in your pantry because, well, how many of us eat whole-wheat berries or whole kernel corn? If the time arises and you need your survival food, the wheat berries and kernel corn can be soaked and sprouted for a few days before steaming and eating. Brown rice definitely instead of white rice, do some research about the nutrition of white rice compared to brown and you will agree. Whole-wheat flour and cornmeal are also good foods for stashing away; flat chapatti-style breads can be made with these flours by adding water and cooking on a cast iron griddle. Sprout seeds are wonderful to have as you can make a nice meal with a chapatti covered in sprouts. Buy a…

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Someone Should Make a “Guilty” App

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Really, guilty or not guilty. We spend way too much energy on unnecessary guilt. What if we had an app that were designed to tell us whether we should feel guilty or not? We could get up in the morning, plug our thoughts into the app and then let go – or not. And before going to bed at night we could tap, tap, tap our worries into the app and it would clear our conscience – or not. And with the evolution of guilty or not technology would come Civil Court usage and eventually Superior Court guilty or not apps. Think of all the admin costs it would save, leaving taxpayers guilt free! Or not.

Suellen Ocean is the author of Gold River. Available here:

Gold River: http://www.amazon.com/Gold-River-Suellen-Ocean/dp/1484094042

eBooks and computer downloads available through Smashwords:

https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/ocean

Small towns make big romances.

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How To Prepare Pumpkin Seeds From Raw Pumpkin

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Ever wish you could make your own pumpkin seeds? Usually there are a lot of pumpkins around at Halloween. If you have horses, they love the raw pumpkin and parings left over after pie is made and the seeds are said to be good for fighting parasites. These seeds are prepared without the use of oil.

Boil pumpkin seeds in salt water for five minutes. (Add 1 tsp salt for up to a quart of water). Cool, drain then bake at 350 degrees until golden brown. It only takes a few minutes – watch ‘em, they’ll burn.

Suellen Ocean is the author of the vegetarian cookbook, Poor Jonny’s Cookbook.Available here:

http://www.amazon.com/Poor-Jonnys-Cookbook-Suellen-Ocean/dp/0965114031

eBook or computer download through Smashwords:

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/260122

eBook through Barnes & Noble:

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/poor-jonnys-cookbook-suellen-ocean/1102338251?ean=2940016618609

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Sex… It Was My Husband’s Idea

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Writing a how-to book about sex was not my idea. It was my husband’s. We had just finished college and I was feverishly writing away on my novels. “We should write a book about sex,” he said to me one day, to which I literally laughed in his face, “Yeah, riiiiight.” “No really,” he continued, “sex sells.” After much campaigning, I finally agreed. He would come up with a lot of the ideas and I would do the research. I went to the library and came home with all kinds of books and he continued cracking jokes and adding fun stuff to the mix. He would talk his ideas into a tape recorder and I would listen and transcribe them, typing them into a book. I spent a lot of time drawing pictures for the book but when he saw them, he shook his head and said, “No, no, no…

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Acorn Chocolate Cake, a Rare Treat

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Acorn Chocolate Cake

Mix together well with a fork:

2 cups flour

2/3 cup baking cocoa

1 tsp baking powder

1 tsp baking soda

½ tsp salt

In a second bowl mix:

1 & ¾ cup sugar

¾ cup ground, leached, cooked, pre-frozen, thawed and drained acorns. Complete directions for leaching acorns are available in the book “Acorns and Eat’em,” available here:  http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973

½ cup rice milk (dairy milk O.K.)

2 tsp vanilla extract

Slowly add to sugar and acorn mixture:

2 beaten eggs

¾ cup water

Carefully add sugar mixture to the first bowl. Mix well.

Oil and flour two 9″ cake pans (or one 13X9). Bake in a pre-heated oven at 350 degrees for 25-35 minutes. Cool.

Chocolate Frosting

1 & 1/2 cups powdered sugar

2/3 cup baking cocoa

½ cup butter (one stick) or substitute

5-6 Tbs rice milk (dairy milk O.K.)

1 tsp vanilla extract

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