Anxious to Try Eating Acorns? Time to Think About It

Leaching Acorns

People tell me all the time that when they see acorns on the ground, they think of me. So now, when I see acorns on the ground, I think of the people who are thinking of me when they see acorns. Sometimes there are acorns… everywhere. I’ve had people tell me that they rake up bags and bags of acorns in the fall and… sigh… put them in the garbage.

Some areas have prolific acorns. In other areas, when a few acorns fall to the ground, there will be fifteen different wildlife creatures fighting over them. Vultures love to hang out near the road where cars drive over them and crack them. Squirrels fight for their share. Deer eat them. Horses will eat them too but I’m not so sure that they should. Field mice come running in for their share and then the tiniest of creatures, the acorn worms, well, sometimes they are the first to get at it. That’s why it’s important that you get there first, with the intention of analyzing your area so that you leave enough for the critters.

What do you do, once you’ve gathered the acorns? I’ll tell you what you shouldn’t do and that’s leave them lying around. If there are any worms in there, they will devour them. It’s best to… get cracking. Once you’ve cracked them and removed the shells, put them in Ziplocs and freeze them until you’re ready to use them. My husband Jon, made a video of my acorn leaching process. Watch the how-to video, Acorns and Eat’em www.youtube.com/watch?v=CG-5EDrHDhM

And I wrote a book and created lots of delicious recipes, Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns. Find it here: http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973

Have fun! You’ve no excuse. Unless of course, you live in an area where the acorns are sparse and you know the animals depend on them.

Eating Acorns and Sharing with Woodpeckers

CreatespaceAcornsAndEat'emFRONTCOVERNature never ceases to amaze me. Did you know that a woodpecker has a tongue that is twice the length of its beak? It is so long, when not in use, it wraps up inside the bird’s head cavity. When it is in use, it drills down ant hills and scoops out the prey. Here’s the sad part. When there aren’t enough acorns, woodpeckers die. And you know the dead trees that are full of holes that are full of acorns? Those are called granaries and they take years to build up and support woodpecker communities.

As more and more people learn to enjoy cooking with acorns, I hope they will not forget the myriad of woodland animals who depend on them for food. It’s that time of year. Let’s gather acorns. But let’s leave an abundance for the birds.Secret Genealogy IV Cover

Suellen Ocean is the author of Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns, http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973 and Secret Genealogy IV – Native Americans Hidden in Our Family Trees. http://www.amazon.com/Secret-Genealogy-IV-Native-Americans/dp/1500756105

 

 

Eating Acorns: Is It OK If They Are Dry?

It seems a silly question, whether or not you can eat dried acorns but those who are unfamiliar with the ancient art of leaching acorns have many questions. I often dry my acorns first, I like to put them by the woodstove or out in the sun in a basket for awhile, it kinda helps dry any worms out. They’re fine dry. Sometimes they may look discolored (really dark) but that’s just the tannic acid. If they get really dry, they may be harder on your blender blades (and your teeth) if they don’t get ground up well. Is it a very good acorn year for you? Another bad year in the Sierra Foothills for acorns with the exception of the Valley Oak. I found a park where there were a lot of huge acorns. I’m leaching them now.  Suellen Ocean is the author of Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns. Find it here: http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973

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Acorns? Yes! You Can Eat Acorns!

Years ago I wanted to know how to eat acorns. I went to the library to find books on eating acorns but was unable to understand how Native Americans prepared them. With a lot of trial and error, and many stomach aches, I figured it out. That was back in the late 1970’s. In 1993 I published the book, “Acorns and Eat’em”, a vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns. About ten years later, due to the cost of printing, I was unable to continue publishing it. The California Oak Foundation has since been offering it as a free download on their website, http://www.californiaoaks.org. But now with technology changing, it is once again in my reach to print books. “Acorns and Eat’em” is back in print through Amazon’s Createspace.  In the book, you’ll find the information you need to begin gathering and cooking with acorns, including recipes. If you haven’t tried acorns yet, you’re in for a treat. They are a magical food used for thousands of years by ancestors everywhere! The book is small enough to fit into a briefcase, backpack or large purse. I hope you enjoy eating acorns as much as I do! I’m including the link to my Amazon author page but I just added Acorns and Eat’em.  People are selling the book as a “collectible”. I’ve seen it as high as $210. 00, no kidding. I just added it to my Amazon page and they told me the new edition may take a few days to show up.  Because the paperback edition is new, you’ll have to search for it. It’s the one that is $12.98, perhaps discounted to $11.54. You’ll find it!

Suellen Ocean is the author of Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns. Find it here: http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973

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Diabetics Eating Acorns… Might Be a Good Idea

A friend sent me a link the other day. She saw a story about acorns and knew I had to read it. I’m glad she did because it verified a couple of issues. One, when people ask me what acorns taste like, the only thing I can think of is that they remind me a little bit like an olive. As it turns out, acorns have similarities with olives and I encourage you to follow the link to the story to find out what those similarities are. The story also verifies what a Hopi dietician told me, she wanted to give my book to her American Indian clients who had diabetes, because she believed acorns would be beneficial to them. Don’t forget to leave plenty of acorns for the wildlife. Here is the link to the article: http://primaldocs.com/opinion/olives-and-acorns/ And here’s the link to my book: Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns. Find it here: http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973

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Acorn Chocolate Cake, a Rare Treat

Acorn Chocolate Cake

Mix together well with a fork:

2 cups flour

2/3 cup baking cocoa

1 tsp baking powder

1 tsp baking soda

½ tsp salt

In a second bowl mix:

1 & ¾ cup sugar

¾ cup ground, leached, cooked, pre-frozen, thawed and drained acorns. Complete directions for leaching acorns are available in the book “Acorns and Eat’em,” available here:  http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973

½ cup rice milk (dairy milk O.K.)

2 tsp vanilla extract

Slowly add to sugar and acorn mixture:

2 beaten eggs

¾ cup water

Carefully add sugar mixture to the first bowl. Mix well.

Oil and flour two 9″ cake pans (or one 13X9). Bake in a pre-heated oven at 350 degrees for 25-35 minutes. Cool.

Chocolate Frosting

1 & 1/2 cups powdered sugar

2/3 cup baking cocoa

½ cup butter (one stick) or substitute

5-6 Tbs rice milk (dairy milk O.K.)

1 tsp vanilla extract

Suellen Ocean is the author of Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns. Find it here: http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973

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Eating Wild Foods… Leaching Acorns

Leaching Acorns

When leaching acorns, the ratio of water to acorns is important. Acorns are rather starchy and when they’re dry, they soak up a lot of water. I probably use more water than is necessary but I usually say 3 parts water to one part acorns. For example, if you have one cup of acorns, I recommend using at least three cups of water when you put them into the blender to leach them. That’s probably enough. It’s fine if you use more water than that. If you have several cups of acorns, only grind one cup at a time. And don’t forget to take the shells off first!CreatespaceAcornsAndEat'emFRONTCOVER

Suellen Ocean is the author of Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns. Find it here: http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973