Food&Cooking: The Best Dish at the Party… Teenagers Love it!

You’re going to be surprised when I say acorn dip but it’s true. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve taken acorn dip to a party, only to have the teenagers obsessing over it, especially the boys. I’ve come to conclude that there is something in the acorns that a growing teenager’s body needs. And acorns bring that special flavor, like Mediterranean olives or pungent cheese. The acorn dip is fashioned after your typical onion dip except I use dried onions from a natural foods store and I add a small bit of soy sauce. Surround the dip with Aztecan Blue Corn Chips and you have yourself an unusual hit!   Suellen Ocean is the author of Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns. Find it here: http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973

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Are Acorns Poisonous? No, Not If Leached Correctly

The ingredient in acorns that’s considered harmful is tannic acid; also abundant in the teas we drink. It is true that too much tannic acid can cause upset stomach but just as the teabag loses tannic acid as it’s dipped in water, so does the acorn when it’s ground and soaked in water. How long you soak your ground acorns depends on the variety you have. Along California’s coast, tan oak acorns are abundant and only need a week to leach. Further inland, my experience is that the acorns need at least two weeks. It’s no big deal though; the ground acorns just sit in your refrigerator in a jar full of water. You can change the water a few times a week and you’re good to go!  Suellen Ocean is the author of Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns. Find it here: http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973

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Make Acorn Bread & Cookies for Your Holiday Gift Baskets

Tired of the usual? Bake acorn bread and cookies and place them in a basket lined with a bright red cloth napkin. Add a few apples, some pears and a handful of unshelled walnuts. Cut a sprig from a cedar or fir branch and prop that in there. Giving your loved ones a gift of health shows you care. The spirit of the forest has always had a place in both the mythology and reality of this season. Whatever your beliefs, it is a time when we can stop and appreciate the simple treasures of nature and the coming light after the winter solstice. Suellen Ocean is the author of Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns. Find it here: http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973

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