What’s the Difference Between Apple Cider and Apple Juice?

This hot weather makes me thirsty. There’s nothing more refreshing on a hot day then an ice cold glass of apple… cider? Juice? What’s the difference? The word cider means “strong drink.” The definition of cider is, “the expressed juice of apples, used for drinking and for making vinegar.” That sounds like juice to me. When I look at the calorie count, they both have 100 for an eight ounce glass. The only difference I see is that the cider is darker. I know it must be in the process. Maybe the cider is made from the peels too, or something of that nature and the juice is made from just the juice. On both bottles it states that they are made from the juice of apples. The state of Massachusetts has a web page devoted to explaining their definition between cider and juice. Their definition of cider is what Californian’s call “unfiltered,” which is my preference. At any rate, the Massachusetts website says that apple cider is high in potassium. That’s a good thing. Also a plus… a high pectin content, good for lowering cholesterol. In California, look for “raw” or “unfiltered.” In Massachusetts, look for the word “cider.”

Suellen Ocean is the author of the vegetarian cookbook, Poor Jonny’s Cookbook. Available here:

http://www.amazon.com/Poor-Jonnys-Cookbook-Suellen-Ocean/dp/0965114031

eBook or computer download through Smashwords:

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/260122

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Food and Cooking… How Long Should You Cook Acorns?

If you have reached the point where you are about to cook up some acorns, congratulations. It means that you have probably hiked out into the yard or countryside and bent over many times and picked up acorns. Then you shelled them (which isn’t always easy). And you must have ground them and leached them and now you are ready to cook them so you can add them to your favorite recipes.

Acorns do not need a lot of cooking and I would not cook them at high heat because they will stick to the bottom. Just a little simmer, for about five or ten minutes will do the trick. Don’t overcook them, you may lose flavor that way.

Suellen Ocean is the author of Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns. Find it here: http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973

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In the Garden… Time to Glamorize Cabbage

Cabbage may turn up a few noses but I wouldn’t be surprised if somewhere in history there was a cult that worshipped the big sphere. Cabbage is so versatile it can be used raw in coleslaw and my favorite use is chopped and used in place of lettuce in a salad. With the addition of avocado and tomato and any other favorite salad additions, it’s tasty and filling. And of course, there’s always stuffed cabbage. The leaves are so large they lend themselves nicely to stuffing. If you want a stuffed pasta dish but you’re on a diet, using cabbage leaves instead of pasta works well. Stuffed cabbage can also take on an Asian flair if filled with fried rice. An Italian dish could be made if you stuffed cabbage leaves with tomato puree, vegetables, tofu, onions, Italian spices and cheese on top, then baked. I’ve had chopped cabbage in many a Mexican restaurant, it mixes well with hot peppers. And then there’s the fermented food called sauerkraut, some people swear by if for their health. Whatever you dream up for your cabbage, you’ll take pleasure in knowing that eating cabbage is reputed to help prevent cancer. Suellen Ocean is the author of the vegetarian cookbook, Poor Jonny’s Cookbook. Available here:

Paperback:

https://www.createspace.com/4282927

eBook or computer download through Smashwords:

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/260122

eBook through Amazon:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004PGO2EA/ref=nrn_si_text

eBook through Barnes & Noble:

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/poor-jonnys-cookbook-suellen-ocean/1102338251?ean=2940016618609

Poor Jonny's Cover

Life Got You Down? Spend Time with a Wise Old Tree

We get nuts, oils and fruit from trees but spending time with them brings energy and inspiration. They don’t speak to us in the manner that humans do but their longevity speaks volumes. What have we been through that they have not? One of my favorite big ol’ trees spreads a shady canopy over an old schoolyard. You can see where years ago, lovebirds carved their initials into it. The ancient tree has withstood fire danger and storms. Wet winters threatened fungus infestations while insects waited to make a home in its dead carcass. Next time you need inspiration, go find a wise old tree. Lean up against it and receive its embrace. Gain strength in the knowledge that you too can grow and prosper through life’s difficult times. I don’t know who said it but I’ll never forget it, “That great oak was once just a little nut that held its ground.” Suellen Ocean is the author of Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns. Find it here: http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973

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Bread Is Expensive, Make Wholegrain Chapattis Instead

A good loaf of bread in California is four to five dollars. That’s a chunk of cash for what many think of as “the staff of life.” But what surprises me is how many people today don’t know that for pennies you can make delicious quick breads. If you have a good cast iron skillet you can make delicious chapattis out of flour and water. It takes experience to get it right and even pros can burn them but they are delicious and you turn a tight budget into a gourmet opportunity. The key is to use cast iron and to have it warm before you put the flour mixture in it. The flour mixture is just flour, water and a tiny bit of salt and it is made up just like kid’s play dough but it is a bit “dry.” You can roll them out on a floured board or have a little flour in the skillet and pat the dough into it. Be careful that you don’t get burned. Cook it on medium heat, flipping it after a few minutes depending on how hot the skillet is. If you incorporate herbs and seeds into the dough it is very tasty. Sesame seeds, caraway seeds and herbs and spices make these chapattis a treat. Have them with anything from shredded carrots, sprouts, hummus, beans or sour cream and cheese.

Suellen Ocean is the author of the vegetarian cookbook, Poor Jonny’s Cookbook. Available here:

http://www.amazon.com/Poor-Jonnys-Cookbook-Suellen-Ocean/dp/0965114031

eBook or computer download through Smashwords:

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/260122

eBook through Barnes & Noble:

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/poor-jonnys-cookbook-suellen-ocean/1102338251?ean=2940016618609

Poor Jonny’s Tortillas

Jonny’s Tortillas

1 & ½ cups whole wheat flour

¼ cup rye flour

1 Tbs sesame seeds

1 Tbs carob powder for flavor

Use water to make dough thick enough to roll out or pat onto a dry cast iron skillet. Heat thoroughly, turn and heat other side thoroughly cooking tortilla completely. Pile tortillas as you make them and keep them covered to stay warm. Top with honey when ready to serve.  Suellen Ocean is the author of the vegetarian cookbook, Poor Jonny’s Cookbook. Available here:

http://www.amazon.com/Poor-Jonnys-Cookbook-Suellen-Ocean/dp/0965114031

eBook or computer download through Smashwords:

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/260122

eBook through Barnes & Noble:

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/poor-jonnys-cookbook-suellen-ocean/1102338251?ean=2940016618609