Acorn Crackers… It’s About Time!

Those of you who’ve known me for decades, know that I’m the lady who wanders into the forest gathering acorns and shows up at potlucks with a bowl of acorn dip. Back in the late 1970’s I truly believed that I could live off the land and eating acorns was an obvious choice. I knew the Indians leached them but I wasn’t sure how they did that. I went to the library and could find nothing but a few pictures and the fact that they leached them. I received more than my fair share of stomach aches trying to figure out how many days were necessary to leach acorns. Eventually I did and as the years progressed I got pretty fancy with acorns and wrote directions for leaching acorns and all the recipes I created and put them into a how-to cookbook and field guide. One of those recipes I came up with was “Acorn Crunchies.” If you do it just right, acorns can be made into a crunchie treat. Well guess what? Someone has finally brought to market an acorn cracker and though I haven’t tasted it yet the pictures look delicious. The folks who are bringing this to market have asked me if I would share their news. Here is the link to their website where you can see their beautiful, tasty-looking crackers. www.mightywild.com Good luck folks!

Suellen Ocean is the author of Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns. Find it here: http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973

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The Druids and their Little People… Think Fairies

CreatespaceAcornsAndEat'emFRONTCOVERThe Druids believed in little people and that these little people lived inside the oak trees. I’m not sure they didn’t, I don’t know, I wasn’t there but recently a tiny human was found, so maybe at one time there were little people. The Druids were convinced and probably all of ancient Ireland believed in them. It’s a great legend. Let’s say it’s true, there were little tiny people at one time. If I was a little person, say six inches, I think I’d find a lot to love about a big oak tree. One acorn would be a whole meal. Little people could spend their entire life in the environment of that one oak tree. There would be branches to climb, oak galls to push and play with and there are always little nooks and crannies where a little person could find shelter from the elements. I never believed in fairies, I always knew it was made up but after I read about the discovery of a six-inch humanoid, I’ve had to rethink it. The next time you see an oak, think of the little people (fairies and elves) who may inhabit that tree. Why not? People have grown taller over the years… you just never know.
Suellen Ocean is the author of Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns. Find it here: http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973

Eating Acorns… Are They Fattening or Just Delicious?

They do fatten hogs with acorns but we humans eat them in such small amounts I doubt there’s much to worry about. Nutritionally, acorns are said to be comparable to barley, a grain, so yes there are carbohydrates to digest but I’ve NEVER, EVER worried about gaining weight with acorns. BUT… the Acorn Chocolate Cake and Acorn Cheesecake that I make with the acorns… that’s a different story. Next time you see acorns on the ground, grab a handful, take them home and shell, grind and leach them. Make Acorn Onion Dip or the desserts I just mentioned. Be sure to invite friends to join you, otherwise you may find yourself devouring your acorn dishes all by yourself. They’re THAT good. Suellen Ocean is the author of Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns. Find it here: http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973

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Diabetics Eating Acorns… Might Be a Good Idea

A friend sent me a link the other day. She saw a story about acorns and knew I had to read it. I’m glad she did because it verified a couple of issues. One, when people ask me what acorns taste like, the only thing I can think of is that they remind me a little bit like an olive. As it turns out, acorns have similarities with olives and I encourage you to follow the link to the story to find out what those similarities are. The story also verifies what a Hopi dietician told me, she wanted to give my book to her American Indian clients who had diabetes, because she believed acorns would be beneficial to them. Don’t forget to leave plenty of acorns for the wildlife. Here is the link to the article: http://primaldocs.com/opinion/olives-and-acorns/ And here’s the link to my book: Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns. Find it here: http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973

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Eating Acorns… Are They Nuts?

Acorns are not nuts but to be honest, they definitely resemble them. The acorn is the fruit of the oak. Popular tree nuts are pistachio, Brazil, almond, walnut, cashew, hazelnut, and pistachio. Peanuts, sesame seeds and sunflower seeds are not nuts, they are legumes. A tanoak tree is a hybrid cross between a chestnut and an oak tree. But then we have the question, is a chestnut a nut? The chestnut is a member of the oak and beech family. If you are allergic to chestnuts, you may consider this before eating tanoak acorns, but I’ve been teaching the art of eating acorns for over thirty years and I’ve yet to have anyone tell me they had an allergic reaction to acorns of any variety. If you haven’t tried leaching and eating acorns, I urge you to do so. Even in very small amounts, the acorn can add texture and flavor to many dishes.  Suellen Ocean is the author of Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns. Find it here: http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973

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