Preparing Acorns For Food… Which Acorns Did the Indians Use and Still Use Today?

Native Americans used and still use today, acorns from oak trees that grew around them. In the past, some Native American families ate hundreds of pounds of acorns every year. In the valleys of California there is a large oak with large acorns, the tree is called the Valley Oak. Of course, it was and still is a fine acorn and those living close to it have benefited from all the meat in these large acorns. But another acorn, a tiny one so bitter the Latin name is Quercus Revoltus, was probably used by Indians who lived in it’s habitat because they utilized the food that grew around them. One tribe buried their acorns in the wet ground until they turned pink because that made them sweeter. What was happening was the acorn was sprouting in the wet soil, turning it from a starch to a sugar state, making it much more palatable.  Suellen Ocean is the author of Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns. Find it here: http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973

CreatespaceAcornsAndEat'emFRONTCOVER

Advertisements

The Historical & Cultural Significance of Oaks & Their Edible Fruit, the Acorn

There are not many places around the world where oak trees haven’t left their mark. The giant oaks were so stout and the wood so long-lasting, many an ancient habitation was built using oak stumps for a foundation, some reportedly still standing hundreds of years later. The Greeks and the Romans both chose the oak to build their homes, ships and bridges. The Vikings used the oak heartwood to build their long ships and later the English used it to build their legendary fleet of war ships. An old Encyclopedia Britannica from 1884 stated that, “the church till recently standing at Greenstead in Essex, and supposed to have been erected in the 10th century was wholly formed of oak trunks roughly squared.”

The fruit of the oak, the acorn, was also prized by the ancients. The oak was, and still is sacred to the Druids of Northern Britain and it is easy to understand why.  Suellen Ocean is the author of Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns. Find it here: http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973

CreatespaceAcornsAndEat'emFRONTCOVER

Peppermint is Good Medicine

I always like to have peppermint growing in my garden. I drink it the way others drink soda pop. I usually don’t add anything to sweeten it, because it is fine alone but a touch of honey is nice. In the old herbals peppermint is used for ailments from A – Z, including nausea, vomiting, flu, hysteria, dizziness, fevers, etc. One source even claims it helps insanity. No wonder it’s so popular! I’d be careful about drinking it too soon before bedtime because it appears to be an excellent diuretic and you might make a lot of trips to the bathroom during the night.

Suellen Ocean is the author of Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns. Find it here: http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973

CreatespaceAcornsAndEat'emFRONTCOVER

Food/Cooking: Discovering the Versatility of Split Peas, No Really…

If you haven’t discovered split pea soup, you’re missing out on a natural “fast food”. Split peas don’t need to be soaked first, cook quickly, are nutritious, versatile and delicious. The only caveat I have is that it must have soy sauce or tamari on it. If you’re in a hurry, cook up some pea soup and douse it with soy sauce before eating, what a delicious meal. Even without good bread to accompany it, you’ll enjoy it. Adding pre-cooked potato chunks add carbs and there is no end to the fresh garden vegetables you can include, especially carrots, they add sweetness. DO NOT FORGET TO ADD A TOUCH OF CURRY SEASONING WITH TUMERICK, a good spice to eat regularly. And if you have access to acorns, try some acorn split pea soup.

Suellen Ocean is the author of Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns. Find it here: http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973

CreatespaceAcornsAndEat'emFRONTCOVER

Attitude Is Everything? What About Food?

I met someone last Saturday who was firing questions at me regarding survival food. She knew of my book, Acorns And Eat’em and was hoping to supplement her diet with them. Two problems with that. One, it’s a bad year for acorns in her neck of the woods, they are nowhere to be found. Two, acorns are not great for eating large quantities of unless you are starving, which is what this woman and her boyfriend are worried about. “I have no money,” she said. She held a government job but retired early hoping to find a new life’s calling, then they lost their home and headed for the hills. She has a great attitude and is accomplished at networking. I told he she could eat a lot of potatoes. But I went to bed Saturday night, tossed and turned all night long with her words ringing in my head. “I get to go to the food bank once a month. I only have the nerve to take about eight little red potatoes.” I told her where to look for acorns.

Suellen Ocean is the author of the vegetarian cookbook, Poor Jonny’s Cookbook. Available here:

http://www.amazon.com/Poor-Jonnys-Cookbook-Suellen-Ocean/dp/0965114031

eBook or computer download through Smashwords:

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/260122

eBook through Barnes & Noble:

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/poor-jonnys-cookbook-suellen-ocean/1102338251?ean=2940016618609

From Mice To Moose-Sized Deer / Predators In My Garden

I think the mice are eating as much as the deer, although it is a huge thrill to come face to face with a buck staring you down on the other side of the garden fence. But the deer stay out while the mice party down night and day on organic heirloom tomatoes and cantaloupe. My husband told me the neighbor’s cat was in there yesterday. Much as I love those cute little mice, I hope our feline friend enjoys his daily patrol and the rodents go back to their native fare … acorns!

 

Suellen Ocean is the author of Gold River one of her books for a buck available at Amazon.

Acorns Give A Deep, Rich Color to Dishes

Whether it be soup, stews, dressings, desserts or dips, acorns provide an appealing depth of color. There have been quite a few gatherings where I have brought an acorn dish only to find the young and old gathered around it as if they couldn’t get enough. Is there something in this wild food that our bodies are longing for? Acorns also contribute a wonderful texture to any dish. Seek out Suellen Ocean’s website for a free download of her book, Acorns and Eat’em.